MacMinds - great minds think different

Navigatie

Zoeken

Inloggegevens

Je bent niet ingelogd.


#51 06-05-2010 20:09

Pieterr
@ Eindhoven
Geregistreerd: 08-06-2008

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Mededingingszaak tegen Apple breidt zich uit

Is Steve straks al z'n cycles kwijt aan rechtzaken ipv vernieuwende producten bedenken?

Offline

 

#52 09-05-2010 20:34

tsjerk@home.nl
@ sneek
Geregistreerd: 08-08-2008
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

De orginele brief die op de Apple site te vinden is van Steve Jobs over; waarom het gebruik van flash (nog) niet word toegestaan en de 2 reuzen elkaa. momenteel in de haren zitten. 

Apple has a long relationship with Adobe. In fact, we met Adobe’s founders when they were in their proverbial garage. Apple was their first big customer, adopting their Postscript language for our new Laserwriter printer. Apple invested in Adobe and owned around 20% of the company for many years. The two companies worked closely together to pioneer desktop publishing and there were many good times. Since that golden era, the companies have grown apart. Apple went through its near death experience, and Adobe was drawn to the corporate market with their Acrobat products. Today the two companies still work together to serve their joint creative customers – Mac users buy around half of Adobe’s Creative Suite products – but beyond that there are few joint interests.

I wanted to jot down some of our thoughts on Adobe’s Flash products so that customers and critics may better understand why we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. Adobe has characterized our decision as being primarily business driven – they say we want to protect our App Store – but in reality it is based on technology issues. Adobe claims that we are a closed system, and that Flash is open, but in fact the opposite is true. Let me explain.

First, there’s “Open”.

Adobe’s Flash products are 100% proprietary. They are only available from Adobe, and Adobe has sole authority as to their future enhancement, pricing, etc. While Adobe’s Flash products are widely available, this does not mean they are open, since they are controlled entirely by Adobe and available only from Adobe. By almost any definition, Flash is a closed system.

Apple has many proprietary products too. Though the operating system for the iPhone, iPod and iPad is proprietary, we strongly believe that all standards pertaining to the web should be open. Rather than use Flash, Apple has adopted HTML5, CSS and JavaScript – all open standards. Apple’s mobile devices all ship with high performance, low power implementations of these open standards. HTML5, the new web standard that has been adopted by Apple, Google and many others, lets web developers create advanced graphics, typography, animations and transitions without relying on third party browser plug-ins (like Flash). HTML5 is completely open and controlled by a standards committee, of which Apple is a member.

Apple even creates open standards for the web. For example, Apple began with a small open source project and created WebKit, a complete open-source HTML5 rendering engine that is the heart of the Safari web browser used in all our products. WebKit has been widely adopted. Google uses it for Android’s browser, Palm uses it, Nokia uses it, and RIM (Blackberry) has announced they will use it too. Almost every smartphone web browser other than Microsoft’s uses WebKit. By making its WebKit technology open, Apple has set the standard for mobile web browsers.

Second, there’s the “full web”.

Adobe has repeatedly said that Apple mobile devices cannot access “the full web” because 75% of video on the web is in Flash. What they don’t say is that almost all this video is also available in a more modern format, H.264, and viewable on iPhones, iPods and iPads. YouTube, with an estimated 40% of the web’s video, shines in an app bundled on all Apple mobile devices, with the iPad offering perhaps the best YouTube discovery and viewing experience ever. Add to this video from Vimeo, Netflix, Facebook, ABC, CBS, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, ESPN, NPR, Time, The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Sports Illustrated, People, National Geographic, and many, many others. iPhone, iPod and iPad users aren’t missing much video.

Another Adobe claim is that Apple devices cannot play Flash games. This is true. Fortunately, there are over 50,000 games and entertainment titles on the App Store, and many of them are free. There are more games and entertainment titles available for iPhone, iPod and iPad than for any other platform in the world.

Third, there’s reliability, security and performance.

Symantec recently highlighted Flash for having one of the worst security records in 2009. We also know first hand that Flash is the number one reason Macs crash. We have been working with Adobe to fix these problems, but they have persisted for several years now. We don’t want to reduce the reliability and security of our iPhones, iPods and iPads by adding Flash.

In addition, Flash has not performed well on mobile devices. We have routinely asked Adobe to show us Flash performing well on a mobile device, any mobile device, for a few years now. We have never seen it. Adobe publicly said that Flash would ship on a smartphone in early 2009, then the second half of 2009, then the first half of 2010, and now they say the second half of 2010. We think it will eventually ship, but we’re glad we didn’t hold our breath. Who knows how it will perform?

Fourth, there’s battery life.

To achieve long battery life when playing video, mobile devices must decode the video in hardware; decoding it in software uses too much power. Many of the chips used in modern mobile devices contain a decoder called H.264 – an industry standard that is used in every Blu-ray DVD player and has been adopted by Apple, Google (YouTube), Vimeo, Netflix and many other companies.

Although Flash has recently added support for H.264, the video on almost all Flash websites currently requires an older generation decoder that is not implemented in mobile chips and must be run in software. The difference is striking: on an iPhone, for example, H.264 videos play for up to 10 hours, while videos decoded in software play for less than 5 hours before the battery is fully drained.

When websites re-encode their videos using H.264, they can offer them without using Flash at all. They play perfectly in browsers like Apple’s Safari and Google’s Chrome without any plugins whatsoever, and look great on iPhones, iPods and iPads.

Fifth, there’s Touch.

Flash was designed for PCs using mice, not for touch screens using fingers. For example, many Flash websites rely on “rollovers”, which pop up menus or other elements when the mouse arrow hovers over a specific spot. Apple’s revolutionary multi-touch interface doesn’t use a mouse, and there is no concept of a rollover. Most Flash websites will need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices. If developers need to rewrite their Flash websites, why not use modern technologies like HTML5, CSS and JavaScript?

Even if iPhones, iPods and iPads ran Flash, it would not solve the problem that most Flash websites need to be rewritten to support touch-based devices.

Sixth, the most important reason.

Besides the fact that Flash is closed and proprietary, has major technical drawbacks, and doesn’t support touch based devices, there is an even more important reason we do not allow Flash on iPhones, iPods and iPads. We have discussed the downsides of using Flash to play video and interactive content from websites, but Adobe also wants developers to adopt Flash to create apps that run on our mobile devices.

We know from painful experience that letting a third party layer of software come between the platform and the developer ultimately results in sub-standard apps and hinders the enhancement and progress of the platform. If developers grow dependent on third party development libraries and tools, they can only take advantage of platform enhancements if and when the third party chooses to adopt the new features. We cannot be at the mercy of a third party deciding if and when they will make our enhancements available to our developers.

This becomes even worse if the third party is supplying a cross platform development tool. The third party may not adopt enhancements from one platform unless they are available on all of their supported platforms. Hence developers only have access to the lowest common denominator set of features. Again, we cannot accept an outcome where developers are blocked from using our innovations and enhancements because they are not available on our competitor’s platforms.

Flash is a cross platform development tool. It is not Adobe’s goal to help developers write the best iPhone, iPod and iPad apps. It is their goal to help developers write cross platform apps. And Adobe has been painfully slow to adopt enhancements to Apple’s platforms. For example, although Mac OS X has been shipping for almost 10 years now, Adobe just adopted it fully (Cocoa) two weeks ago when they shipped CS5. Adobe was the last major third party developer to fully adopt Mac OS X.

Our motivation is simple – we want to provide the most advanced and innovative platform to our developers, and we want them to stand directly on the shoulders of this platform and create the best apps the world has ever seen. We want to continually enhance the platform so developers can create even more amazing, powerful, fun and useful applications. Everyone wins – we sell more devices because we have the best apps, developers reach a wider and wider audience and customer base, and users are continually delighted by the best and broadest selection of apps on any platform.

Conclusions.

Flash was created during the PC era – for PCs and mice. Flash is a successful business for Adobe, and we can understand why they want to push it beyond PCs. But the mobile era is about low power devices, touch interfaces and open web standards – all areas where Flash falls short.

The avalanche of media outlets offering their content for Apple’s mobile devices demonstrates that Flash is no longer necessary to watch video or consume any kind of web content. And the 200,000 apps on Apple’s App Store proves that Flash isn’t necessary for tens of thousands of developers to create graphically rich applications, including games.

New open standards created in the mobile era, such as HTML5, will win on mobile devices (and PCs too). Perhaps Adobe should focus more on creating great HTML5 tools for the future, and less on criticizing Apple for leaving the past behind.

Steve Jobs
April, 2010


100% satisfaction guaranteed

Offline

 

#53 09-05-2010 20:58

3dGuy
Geregistreerd: 07-10-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

@Tjerk, waarom plaats je hier de hele brief waar Pieterr al naar gelinkt heeft in post #29 ?

Pieterr schreef:

Steve Jobs on Flash:
http://www.apple.com/hotnews/thoughts-on-flash/

Offline

 

#54 13-05-2010 18:30

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Offline

 

#55 13-05-2010 19:08

salty
@ Groningen
Geregistreerd: 18-09-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Een mooie brief van de Adobe opa's
Voor de foto: http://www.adobe.com/choice/openmarkets.html


Our thoughts on open markets

John Warnock and Chuck Geschke
The genius of the Internet is its almost infinite openness to innovation. New hardware. New software. New applications. New ideas. They all get their chance.

As the founders of Adobe, we believe open markets are in the best interest of developers, content owners, and consumers. Freedom of choice on the web has unleashed an explosion of content and transformed how we work, learn, communicate, and, ultimately, express ourselves.

If the web fragments into closed systems, if companies put content and applications behind walls, some indeed may thrive — but their success will come at the expense of the very creativity and innovation that has made the Internet a revolutionary force.

We believe that consumers should be able to freely access their favorite content and applications, regardless of what computer they have, what browser they like, or what device suits their needs. No company — no matter how big or how creative — should dictate what you can create, how you create it, or what you can experience on the web.

When markets are open, anyone with a great idea has a chance to drive innovation and find new customers. Adobe's business philosophy is based on a premise that, in an open market, the best products will win in the end — and the best way to compete is to create the best technology and innovate faster than your competitors.

That, certainly, was what we learned as we launched PostScript® and PDF, two early and powerful software solutions that work across platforms. We openly published the specifications for both, thus inviting both use and competition. In the early days, PostScript attracted 72 clone makers, but we held onto our market leadership by out-innovating the pack. More recently, we've done the same thing with Adobe® Flash® technology. We publish the specifications for Flash — meaning anyone can make their own Flash player. Yet, Adobe Flash technology remains the market leader because of the constant creativity and technical innovation of our employees.

We believe that Apple, by taking the opposite approach, has taken a step that could undermine this next chapter of the web — the chapter in which mobile devices outnumber computers, any individual can be a publisher, and content is accessed anywhere and at any time.

In the end, we believe the question is really this: Who controls the World Wide Web? And we believe the answer is: nobody — and everybody, but certainly not a single company.

Chuck Geschke, John Warnock
Cofounders
Chairmen, Adobe Board of Directors

Offline

 

#56 13-05-2010 20:38

HSL
Beheerder
@ Amsterdam
Geregistreerd: 30-07-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

't wordt nu echt een soap,.. kern van het verhaal is gewoon dat apple vind dat adobe voor zowel de desktop als de mobiele apparaten geen fatsoenlijke player maakt. Voor de desktop is het al vervelend, voor mobiele devices gewoon onacceptabel. Ook de flashcompiler voor iPhone apps zorgt voor applicaties die niet goed genoeg zijn en de SDK api's niet efficient genoeg gebruiken. Daar geef ik apple volkomen gelijk in, en zou het liefst op dit moment de flashplayer zelfs niet op desktops willen zien. Maar ze moeten absoluut ophouden met modder gooien, maar ze moeten elkaar gewoon helpen het wel goed te maken. 't is nu iets om moe van te worden.

Offline

 

#57 13-05-2010 21:57

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Ik ben het met je eens over de Flashplayer. Dat Apple geen Flash tolereert op iPhone en iPad is logisch, kan ik helemaal begrijpen. Ik ben het wel met Adobe eens dat ik zelf moet kunnen bepalen hoe ik iets maak. De vraag is of een .ipa die door Flash gegenereerd wordt niet goed is. Wat is "niet efficient genoeg"?
Voorbeeld: ik maak een app die simpelweg de rss feed van MacMinds artikelen binnenhaalt, de interface is volgens de GUI richtlijnen van Apple, wat is er dan mis aan het feit dat het ding niet geschreven is met de programmeertaal en daarna gecompileerd wordt maar gegenereerd door Flash naar .ipa? Wat is dan het verschil? Waarom werden die apps eerst wel toegelaten en nu niet meer?

Offline

 

#58 14-05-2010 18:39

MacBeer
Ex-Crew
@ Limbabwe
Geregistreerd: 04-08-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Apple reageert op de 'we love Apple' boodschap van Adobe grin:

http://img291.yfrog.com/img291/8745/n4f.png


Computers are to design as microwaves are to cooking. Milton Glaser

Offline

 

#59 14-05-2010 19:02

3dGuy
Geregistreerd: 07-10-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Precies!!
Als ze(adobe) dan willen dat hun producten of de maaksels van hun klanten op alle platforms te maken of te bekijken zijn, laat ze dan zorgen dat het overal behoorlijk werkt! En dat hebben ze toch zelf in de hand whistling

Als de meeste Adobe gebruikers op het Mac platform werken. Dan mag je het  er wel op maken maar niet optimaal op bekijken!!

Wat zou er eigenlijk van Adobe zijn geworden als Apple postscript niet van ze had gekocht?

Offline

 

#60 14-05-2010 19:16

HSL
Beheerder
@ Amsterdam
Geregistreerd: 30-07-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

MacMickey schreef:

Waarom werden die apps eerst wel toegelaten en nu niet meer?

Apple heeft de maatregel vooral tegen de flash compiler genomen, die zit pas in CS5. Daar zijn dus ook niet heel veel apps mee gemaakt. maar zo zijn er ook verschillende websites waar je zelf een applicatie inelkaar kan klikken en gelijk voor ieder platform kan compilen, heel makkelijk maar niet goed genoeg.

Offline

 

#61 14-05-2010 19:27

MacBeer
Ex-Crew
@ Limbabwe
Geregistreerd: 04-08-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Het blijft een publiek steekspel tussen 2 giganten waar ik niet vrolijk van word. Diegene die het eerste besluit om te stoppen met dit belachelijke openbare moddergooien wint mijn sympathie.


Computers are to design as microwaves are to cooking. Milton Glaser

Offline

 

#62 14-05-2010 20:06

HSL
Beheerder
@ Amsterdam
Geregistreerd: 30-07-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

't wordt tijd dat iemand een fatsoenlijk alternatief voor het creative suite pakket gaat maken :-)

Offline

 

#63 14-05-2010 20:29

MacBeer
Ex-Crew
@ Limbabwe
Geregistreerd: 04-08-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Quark, leest u mee? whistling


Computers are to design as microwaves are to cooking. Milton Glaser

Offline

 

#64 14-05-2010 20:41

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

3dGuy schreef:

Wat zou er eigenlijk van Adobe zijn geworden als Apple postscript niet van ze had gekocht?

wassat Wat zou er van Apple zijn geworden zonder Adobe zal je bedoelen?? Ach, je hebt de Adobe spullen ook niet nodig, je kan tenslotte met Pages van Apple ook perfecte documenten ontwerpen. Viedo editten gaat prima met FinalCut, jammer dat het niet 64 bit native is zoals Premiere etc, en Aperture kan ook prima gebruikt worden.Jammer dat Lightroom net even wat beter met resources omgaat en al een tijdje 64 bit native is. voor de rest? Je hebt toch Voorvertoning/Preview dus wat zou je met Acrobat Pro moeten toch? En anders idd wat Beer zegt, QuarkXPress met onderhoudscontract want Quark heeft een sterk verkoopargument: "Share high-fidelity print content across the Web and in Flash format — no additional purchase, no coding required!" Ow wacht, dan zijn we dus net zover... hmmm

Offline

 

#65 14-05-2010 20:50

3dGuy
Geregistreerd: 07-10-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Ik denk dat je een alternatief niet van 1 van de oude software makers hoeft te verwachten. En was het niet zo dat indesign er is gekomen door een wat arrogante houding van Quark?

Offline

 

#66 14-05-2010 20:54

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Nee, InDesign is de opvolger van PageMaker. De grote klap die InDesign heeft weten te maken had twee oorzaken: InDesign was "gratis" in het Creative Suite pakket (tip van dhr. S. Jobs te. C.) en was in 2002 native OS X. Dat duurde met QXP nog 2 jaar. Reactie van Quark: Ga maar over op Windows!

Offline

 

#67 14-05-2010 21:33

3dGuy
Geregistreerd: 07-10-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

MacMickey schreef:

3dGuy schreef:

Wat zou er eigenlijk van Adobe zijn geworden als Apple postscript niet van ze had gekocht?

wassat Wat zou er van Apple zijn geworden zonder Adobe zal je bedoelen?

Tja Apple was toen toch al wat groter dan Adobe. En als ze met Postscript geen geld hadden verdiend.... En Microsoft was geloof ik niet zo'n fan van Postscript.

Offline

 

#68 14-05-2010 23:16

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Je bedoeld dit:

"and so Apple visited Microsoft in the late 80s and proposed TrueType as an alternative format to Adobe’s expensive fonts, and Microsoft bought TrueImage and proposed to Apple that it license its PostScript-clone language as an alternative to PostScript.

And Adobe saw the writing on the wall and begged Apple not to leave and Apple agreed to keep licensing PostScript for its laser printers, but the Mac OS and Windows both began using Apple’s TrueType and fonts thus became affordable to mere mortals. And TrueType begat OpenType and never again did anyone pay huge sums for Adobe Type 1 fonts again."

Apple is in het verleden nogal bezig geweest met het dwingen van mensen om spullen op een bepaalde nieuwe manier te maken en/of te herschrijven.

"Jobs visited Adobe again with his combined portfolio of NeXT and Apple. And Adobe said verily to Apple, pay us 30 pieces of silver that we may port our applications to your operating system. And Adobe demanded huge royalties for Display PostScript.

And Jobs brought his operating system to Macromedia and then Microsoft, and they all scoffed at the idea of porting their apps to a new and unproven operating system, and thus Apple was forced to start over and develop a legacy API called Carbon to enable their old code to work on the new operating system. And Apple removed Display PostScript and created a new imaging model based on PDF, which Adobe had released as an open specification. And so Apple no longer needed to pay Adobe royalties for Display PostScript."

Begrijp me goed ik vind Apple een bedrijf dat mooie goede spullen maakt maar beide partijen hebben elkaar gewoon nodig. Laat Adobe nou maar eens een keer goed naar de Flashplayer en CPUload kijken voor de Mac (want dat is dus niet het geval op Windows) en dan zien we wel verder. De .ipa files die vanuit Flash al in de app store stonden werkten gewoon maar sinds de SDK 3.1.1 sectie kan/mag het ineens niet meer..rarara..

Laatst bewerkt door MacMickey (14-05-2010 23:35)

Offline

 

#69 14-05-2010 23:23

HSL
Beheerder
@ Amsterdam
Geregistreerd: 30-07-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

MacMickey schreef:

De .ipa files die vanuit Flash al in de app store stonden werkten gewoon maar sinds de SDK 3.1.1 sectie kan/mag het ineens niet meer..rarara..

Hoe kan dat dan? Flash CS5 is toch pas deze week bij de eerste klanten bezorgd?

Offline

 

#70 14-05-2010 23:34

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Ja dat wel maar het was dus al in de beta's beschikbaar. Zo hebben al een aantal mensen .ipa gemaakt met Flash CS5. Toen kwam Apple met de 3.1.1 sectie. Het was al een tijdje bekend dat het kon, ik heb het zelf gezien op de Adobe Usergroup XL meeting. Mag jij mij uitleggen waarom het dus ineens niet goed was. Er zijn dus apps in de Store terecht gekomen die door Apple zijn goedgekeurd, daarna werd duidelijk dat het apps konden zijn die met Flash gemaakt waren.

Toen heeft Apple gezegd nee dat willen we niet: "“3.3.1 — Applications may only use Documented APIs in the manner prescribed by Apple and must not use or call any private APIs. Applications must be originally written in Objective-C, C, C++, or JavaScript as executed by the iPhone OS WebKit engine, and only code written in C, C++, and Objective-C may compile and directly link against the Documented APIs (e.g., Applications that link to Documented APIs through an intermediary translation or compatibility layer or tool are prohibited).”

Kortom, je moet per jaar $99,- betalen en je mag alleen maar hier gebruik van maken. Beschermen van je markt is 1 ding maar dit neigt aardig naar Big Brother...

Laatst bewerkt door MacMickey (14-05-2010 23:35)

Offline

 

#71 14-05-2010 23:56

3dGuy
Geregistreerd: 07-10-2006

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

MacMickey schreef:

Je bedoeld dit:

"and so Apple visited Microsoft in the late 80sblabala balabalaala....

Ik weet niet waar je deze soap vandaan haalt? Heel vermakelijk geschreven maar zo ver was ik er niet ingedoken innocent

MacMickey schreef:

Begrijp me goed ik vind Apple een bedrijf dat mooie goede spullen maakt maar beide partijen hebben elkaar gewoon nodig. Laat Adobe nou maar eens een keer goed naar de Flashplayer en CPUload kijken voor de Mac (want dat is dus niet het geval op Windows) en dan zien we wel verder. De .ipa files die vanuit Flash al in de app store stonden werkten gewoon maar sinds de SDK 3.1.1 sectie kan/mag het ineens niet meer..rarara

DE vraag is niet zo zeer of het werkt maar wat het met de processor doet. Draait zo'n app dan op een vorm van flash? Met alle nadelen die we op de mac al zien? Of bestaat de mogelijkheid dat iemand aan het prutsen gaat met de Adobe software en daar een gedrocht uit kan komen dat de iphone vast laat lopen.
Of weten ze bij Apple iets van iPhone OS4 of de iPhone G4 waar door dat soort apps niet gewenst zijn?

Offline

 

#72 15-05-2010 00:10

MacMickey
Pro
@ Corusant
Geregistreerd: 17-08-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

De soap stamt dus al vanaf het begin van Apple en Adobe. Adobe was het bedrijf dat de Mac "hielp" aan de grafisch programma's. Illustrator in 1987, Photoshop 1990, Premiere 1991. In 1994 na de fusie met Aldus kwam PageMaker op de Macintosh en in 1993 After Effects. 1995 Adobe kocht Frame om FrameMaker voor het maken van grote documenten op de Mac te zetten. Allemaal verkoopredenen, ook voor Apple wink

Een app gemaakt vanuit Flash draait gewoon native op het iPhone OS en heeft niets meer met Flash of de Flashplayer te maken. Er wordt nl een nette .ipa (iPhone application) gegenereerd. Vergelijk het maar met het maken van een PDF. Als Apple iPhone OS 4 uitbrengt kan het zijn dat er een aantal zaken veranderen, dan kan het zijn dat de conversie dus niet meer kan. Heel simpel maar dat is wat anders dan een regeltje toevoegen in de "licentie". Iedereen kan de iPhone SDK downloaden en gebruiken, kost niets. Ik heb hem zelf ook maar ik ben geen coder en heb de tijd er niet voor om C++ te gaan leren.

Voor mij is de Flash-omweg een uitkomst. Ik heb een idee en kan het dan zelf omzetten naar wat ik wil. Het toelatingsbeleid in de App Store heeft al meerdere malen ter discussie gestaan, dat moeten ze zelf weten. Maar als Apple nou met harde bewijzen komt over het onnodige gebruik van batterij etc door een app die met Flash gemaakt is, dan wordt het een ander verhaal.

Offline

 

#73 15-05-2010 10:57

HSL
Beheerder
@ Amsterdam
Geregistreerd: 30-07-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

MacMickey schreef:

Kortom, je moet per jaar $99,- betalen.

Ja,.. je moet die altijd betalen om een applicatie online te krijgen, de SDK kan je gratis downloaden.

MacMickey schreef:

Een app gemaakt vanuit Flash draait gewoon native op het iPhone OS en heeft niets meer met Flash of de Flashplayer te maken. Er wordt nl een nette .ipa (iPhone application) gegenereerd.

Blijkbaar zit daar het probleem, er wordt geen nette .ipa gemaakt, die apps gebruiken niet de API's van apple, maar eigen interne API's.

MacMickey schreef:

Iedereen kan de iPhone SDK downloaden en gebruiken, kost niets. Ik heb hem zelf ook maar ik ben geen coder en heb de tijd er niet voor om C++ te gaan leren.

En dat is precies de reden waarom apple de appstore wil beschermen smile omdat dan niet programmeurs dingen gaan maken.

MacMickey schreef:

Voor mij is de Flash-omweg een uitkomst. Ik heb een idee en kan het dan zelf omzetten naar wat ik wil

Idem, gelukkig maar. programmeren is een vak apart, netals indesign bestanden opmaken, websites maken e.d.

MacMickey schreef:

Maar als Apple nou met harde bewijzen komt over het onnodige gebruik van batterij etc door een app die met Flash gemaakt is, dan wordt het een ander verhaal.

Sja, ze geven aan dat apps gemaakt op andere platforms niet de API's gebruiken en dat dat niet efficient is. Het wordt lastig dat te bewijzen. En trouwens, die inefficientie is nieteens het probleem, door niet Apple's API's te gebruiken, maar je eigen API's kunnen apps in een keer dingen die misschien niet mogen of die het toestel onveilig maken.

Offline

 

#74 15-05-2010 11:05

salty
@ Groningen
Geregistreerd: 18-09-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Volgens Adobe zijn er tijdens de ontwikkel fase ongeveer 100 apps door Apple goed gekeurd en toegelaten tot de appstore.

Maar HSL,  ben je er blij mee dat Apple zo streng is? En bepaalt wat goed voor je is? Zou je dat voor je mac ook willen?
Wat mij betreft werkt Apple met een keurmerk of zoiets.
Maar hoor je het aan de gebruiker over te laten of hij 'troep' wil installeren.
Of het nu om bloederige spelletjes, tepels, of de FlashPlayer of cross compiled apps gaat.

Laatst bewerkt door salty (15-05-2010 11:07)

Offline

 

#75 15-05-2010 11:40

Deskman
Beheerder
@ the desk
Geregistreerd: 14-09-2006
Website

Re: Adobe vs Apple: Wie wordt het slachtoffer van de scheiding?

Met de komst van de iPad, de opkomst van mobiel internet en de discussie over Flash op het iPhone / iPad platform begint er ineens langzaamaan een andere niet minder interessante discussie te ontstaan.
Er zijn namelijk nogal wat designbureaus en heel veel fotografen die hun website uitsluitend via Flash toegankelijk hebben gemaakt. Filmpjes staan op YouTube, prachtige slideshows staan in Flash en de meest creatieve reclamebureaus hebben een full-featured flash-site.

Stel nou dat Apple voet bij stuk houdt en de toegang tot flash blijft tegenhouden. Stel nou dat Adobe voet bij stuk houdt en geen goedlopende Flash-engine weet te bouwen of wil bouwen. Dan is ineens het platform dat juist zo geschikt leek om onderweg of bij een klant even je werk te laten zien afgesloten.

Om even helemaal buiten de welles-nietes discussie  en ieders stokpaardjes om te redeneren: wat zijn de gevolgen voor de gebruikers die nu zijn portfolio in Flash laat tonen? Moeten die hun adem inhouden? Moeten die nu snel een op JavaScript gebaseerde gallery maken? Of een alternatieve site aanbieden? Of een aangepaste error-pagina waar op te lezen is dat je alleen met een echte computer deze site kunt bezoeken?

Ik kom zelden iets in Flash tegen dat ik kan waarderen en de meeste flash-functionaliteit is ook op een andere manier te bewerkstelligen. Mijn idee voor die portfolio's is dat je maar snel van Flash af moet stappen (en dat eigenlijk al eerder had moeten doen) en voor filmpjes zijn er ook al alternatieven. Maar voor animaties en kunstig vormgegeven Websites en games zijn de alternatieven misschien minder makkelijk te produceren.

Offline

 

Forum voettekst

MacMinds v 1.05 Powered by PunBB